Predictions by science fiction writers

A good story can transport readers to strange new lands, force us to consider our humanity and introduce us to incredible new technology. But how much of what we read about fantastical inventions and life changing technology could actually become a reality?

Predictions by science fiction writers

Antimatter was predicted by Paul Dirac on the basis of his formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. Unipolarity was predicted by Fichte on the basis of his analysis of the challenge of Napoleon and by K'ang Yu-wei on the basis of the macro-historical trend and global closure.

World Wars were predicted by K'ang Yu-wei and George Vacher de Lapouge on the basis of the macro-historical trend and global closure. American unipolarity was predicted by George Vacher de Lapouge on the basis of combination of macro-historical trend, global closure and racial theory and by H.

Wells on the basis of the development level. Futures studies Doomsday equation Heinz von Foerster extrapolated historical population data to predict an infinite human population for Future Shock by Alvin Toffler considered change moving too fast for humans to cope.

Engines of Creation by K. Eric Drexler which involves molecular nanotechnology changing the world, and introduces the grey goo scenario. The End of History and the Last Manby Francis Fukuyama heralded the arrival of the "end point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.

The Clash of Civilizations by Samuel P. Huntingtonpublished in Foreign Affairs, Volume 72, Number 3, Summer and later expanded into a book, states "the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic.

The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations.

The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.

Mooneyham [1] Ray Kurzweil is concerned with the idea of the singularity and many more optimistic technological and transhumanist predictions.

predictions by science fiction writers

No one can see into the future. What I try to do is outline possible "futures" - although totally expected inventions or events can render predictions absurd after only a few years. The classic example is the statement, made in the late s, by the then chairman of IBM that the world market for computers was five.

I have more than that in my own office. Perhaps I am in no position to criticise: On the other hand, I thought I was being wildly optimistic in by suggesting a mission to the moon in Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin beat me by almost a decade. Still, I take pride in the fact that communications satellites are placed exactly where I suggested inand the name "Clarke Orbit" is often used if only because it's easier to say than "geostationary orbit".

Some of the event listed here, particularly the space missions, are already scheduled. I believe all the other events could happen, although several, I hope, will not. Check me for accuracy - on December 31, Clarke - Clarke presents a speculative timeline of the 21st century.

Imagining the Next 50 Years by Bruce Sterling in A popular science approach on futurology, reflecting technology, politics and culture of the next 50 years.

Our Final Hour by Martin Rees in The book presents the notion that the Earth and human survival are in far greater danger from the potential effects of modern technology than is commonly realised.

Hence the 21st century may be a critical moment in history when humanity's fate is decided. This is based on the possibility of malign or accidental release of destructive technology and gained some attention as he is a well-regarded astronomer.

Dark Age Ahead by Jane Jacobs in As it implies the book warns of a pessimistic future, in this case caused by a decay in science, community, and education.The electronic tablet appeared in many science-fiction works many years before it was actually created and sold to the public by the likes of Apple and Samsung.

So with Clarke’s old article in mind, should us science fiction writers be sending our first drafts to the patent office rather than our editors? There have been various notable predictions made throughout history, including those by scientists based on the scientific method, predictions of social and technological change of futurologists, economic forecasts, religious prophecies and the fictional imaginings of authors and science arteensevilla.come fiction author Arthur C.

Clarke wrote three laws of prediction. We can make predictions about what might happen then--and many of the great science fiction writers have done so.

7 Gadget Predictions Sci-Fi Authors Got Right Looking back 30 years or more, these sci-fi authors predicted a dystopian (or, in some cases, a utopian) society. Wells rejected the idea that the future is unknowable, writes esteemed science fiction writer James Gunn, who also helped to pioneer university study of science fiction. There have been various notable predictions made throughout history, including those by scientists based on the scientific method, predictions of social and technological change of futurologists, economic forecasts, religious prophecies and the fictional imaginings of authors and science arteensevilla.come fiction author Arthur C. Clarke wrote three laws of prediction.

But we cannot predict when those things will happen. "However, it seems to me inconceivable that this will take longer than a century or two. Wells rejected the idea that the future is unknowable, writes esteemed science fiction writer James Gunn, who also helped to pioneer university study of science fiction.

7 Gadget Predictions Sci-Fi Authors Got Right by William Gibson William Gibson said that the role of science fiction is not to predict the future but to .

BBC iWonder - Can science fiction writers predict our future?