Brutus and antonys speech

But what people fail to mention is that Brutus' speech was equally great. Brutus might come off as a traitor, and he is, but he had a point to prove. He killed Julius Caesar for the sake of Rome, as he put it. And his speech was effective as he stirred up a commotion among the people.

Brutus and antonys speech

Notice that Brutus speaks with studied plainness of manner, disdaining oratorical tricks and presenting his case with fewest possible words. He believes that his cause is plainly right and needs no defence. He tries to seem to have brought no passion to his deed as assassin. Antony, on the contrary, uses all the tricks of a mob leader.

Julius Caesar

He is overwhelmed with grief and apologizes for his emotion, which, however, he displays before the people with clever effect. He evidently understands his audience better than does Brutus. It is still the ides of March, a few hours perhaps after Caesar's death. Up to this point the conspirators have carried everything before them, but in this scene the tide turns and the spirit of Caesar begins to work out its revenge.

And public reasons, etc.: And reasons for Caesar's death shall be publicly set forth. We should say "has ascended.

Brutus and antonys speech

This construction, common enough in Shakespeare's time, has already occurred in the play. Do you remember "Three parts of him is ours"? Where did Casca say, So every bondman in his own hand bears The power to cancel his captivity?

The question of his death, etc. That is, a statement of the reasons why Cassar was put to death is placed in the official records of the Capitol.

Brutus, who killed Cesar, tries to explain to the audience why he did such a thing, and Antony explains why what Brutus did was wrong. Although Brutus was a good orator and uses rhetoric well, Antony had the more persuasive speech overall. "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" is the first line of a speech by Mark Antony in the play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare. Occurring in Act III, scene II, it is one of the most famous lines in all of Shakespeare's works. Brutus’ speech was very short and to the point and spoke to the logic of the people in the crowd. For example, Brutus spoke in a detached way about Caesar’s death while Antony spoke to the emotions of the crowd by crying and talking about all the good things that Caesar did for Rome.

Here just the opposite of extenuated, -- that is, enlarged, exaggerated. According to Cassius, while Caesar lived, all Romans were "bondmen"; now that he is dead, Brutus believes that the commonwealth will be restored.

Brutus and antonys speech

Shakespeare often uses the nominative case of pronouns after prepositions where modern grammatical usage demands the objective. See "save only he" in V, 5, I am beholden, or under obligations to you. Notice the marked contrast between Antony's style and that of Brutus. The Romans burned their dead.

Shakespeare is speaking to an English audience and thinks of English manners and customs, as when he speaks of the coffin in below. In "The Merchant" Portia speaks of the treasury of Venice as "the privy coffer of the state. Where did Brutus say, "Let no man abide suffer for this deed But we the doers"?

Antony says there are now none so poor or humble but that Csesar is too low for their regard. I have o'ershot myself. That is, I have gone too far I have spoken more than I should.

To overshoot is to shoot beyond, or over, the mark. That day he overcame the Nervii. Caesar tells of his great victory over the Nervii, "the stoutest warriors of all the Belgae," in the second book of his "Gallic War.

Where did Antony send to Brutus to "be resolved How Caesar hath deserved to lie in death"?

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That is, Brutus was one whom Caesar could trust as he would his guardian angel. Possibly angel is equivalent here merely to "best-loved friend," "favorite. Cassius used a similar double superlative when he spoke of "the most boldest and best hearts of Rome. Antonyms repeated assertion that he is not eloquent is summed up by his "I only speak right on.

This is the sum given by Plutarch. The drachma was a Greek coin, worth approximately twenty cents; but of course the purchasing value of the fifteen dollars left by Caesar to each citizen was far greater then than it would be today.Act 3.

Scene II. SCENE II. The Forum. Enter BRUTUS and CASSIUS, and a throng of Citizens and grace his speech Tending to Caesar's glories; which Mark Antony, By our permission, is allow'd to make. but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony.

In reading Plutarch as his source for all the factual information contained in his play, Shakespeare saw that Mark Antony's funeral speech was the critical turning point. Cassius and Brutus have.

Comparison And Contrast Of Brutus and Mark Anthony Funeral S by jasmine johnson on Prezi

Brutus, who killed Cesar, tries to explain to the audience why he did such a thing, and Antony explains why what Brutus did was wrong. Although Brutus was a good orator and uses rhetoric well, Antony had the more persuasive speech overall. "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears" is the first line of a speech by Mark Antony in the play Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare.

Occurring in Act III, scene II, it is one of the most famous lines in all of Shakespeare's works. Brutus’ speech was very short and to the point and spoke to the logic of the people in the crowd. For example, Brutus spoke in a detached way about Caesar’s death while Antony spoke to the emotions of the crowd by crying and talking about all the good things that Caesar did for Rome.

In the case of Mark Antony’s speech at Caesar’s funeral in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and Winston Churchill’s speech at the start of World War II, “Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat” are two speeches dealing with aggression towards a certain matter.

Julius Caesar: Brutus and Mark Antony Comparison – SchoolWorkHelper